The fluid-mechanics of CO2 sequestration – Prof. John Lister (DAMTP)

It’s been quite a while since our last talk – apologies from the committee! We’re back with an exciting one from Professor John Lister – details below.
Date and time: Monday 24th February, 8:30PM
Location: Winstanley Lecture Theatre, Trinity College
Professor John Lister (DAMTP) – The fluid-mechanics of CO2 sequestration
Abstract: Atmospheric CO2 levels are rising rapidly due to anthropogenic emissions. One proposal to reduce emissions and mitigate climate change is to capture and compress the CO2 before emission, and pump it underground into deep porous rock formations such as old oil reservoirs. What happens next? Is this safe? I will describe some mathematical modelling of the resultant porous flows and illustrate the ideas with movies of
analogue laboratory experiments and numerical simulations.

Using maths to clean-up our oceans – Dr Thomas Crawford

Using maths to clean-up our oceans
Dr Thomas Crawford
Monday 20th Jan, 8:30PM, Winstanley Lecture Theatre

This talk will provide a more in-depth look at the content of the Numberphile video: where does river water go?<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5mGh0r3zC6Y> Rivers are the major source of pollution in the oceans and if we are to clean them up, we first need to know
where the majority of the pollution is concentrated. By creating a mathematical model for river outflows –- verified by laboratory experiments and fieldwork –- the goal is to be able to predict which areas are most susceptible to pollution from rivers and thus coordinate clean-up
operations as effectively as possible.

Some elements of algebraic geometry – Professor Caucher Birkar (DPMMS)

Time update: this will start at 5:30PM. This will now be in the CMS, MR2.

Monday 2nd December, 5:30PM

Some elements of algebraic geometry
Professor Caucher Birkar (DPMMS)

Algebraic geometry occupies a central place in modern mathematics. It has deep connections with various parts of mathematics. It is also deeply related to mathematical physics and has found applications in a wide range of topics. In this talk I will introduce some basics of algebraic geometry and then discuss some applications.

TMS Call My Bluff

Monday 25th November, 8:30PM
TMS Call My Bluff
You?

An annual tradition, held by the TMS, in which a team of freshers test their lying capabilities against a team of other students in a reconstruction of the cult British TV show.

High-dimensional data and the Lasso – Dr Rajen Shah (DPMMS)

 Monday 18th November, 8:30PM
High-dimensional data and the Lasso
Dr Rajen Shah (DPMMS) 

How would you try to solve a linear system of equations with more unknowns than equations? Of course, there are infinitely many solutions, and yet this is the sort of the problem statisticians face with many modern datasets, arising in genetics, imaging, finance and many other fields. What’s worse, our equations are often corrupted by noisy measurements! In this talk I will introduce a statistical method called the Lasso that has been at the centre of the huge amount of research that has gone into solving these problems.

TMS Pub Quiz

The TMS is hosting a pub quiz in the Trinity College Junior Parlour tomorrow – come join for an exciting evening, drinks and refreshments provided!
TMS Pub Quiz
Monday 4th October, 8:30PM
Junior Parlour, Trinity College
 
Hope to see lots of you there.

Is classical physics deterministic? – Professor Mihalis Dafermos (DPMMS)

Details for our next talk – on classical physics – are given below.
Is classical physics deterministic?
Professor Mihalis Dafermos (DPMMS)
Monday 28th October, 8:30PM, Winstanley Lecture Theatre
We are all taught that quantum mechanics suffers from lack of determinism. But classical, i.e. non-quantum, physics is supposedly deterministic: complete knowledge of initial conditions in the present uniquely determine the future. This notion of determinism is often associated with the name of Laplace, and finds a mathematical realisation in the standard existence and uniqueness theorems for differential equations. But is it really true that the classical equations of mathematical physics uphold this notion? This talk will explore one of the most spectacular ways that Laplacian determinism can in fact fail.

The Universality Phenomenon – Dr Roland Bauerschmidt (DPMMS)

Our next talk will be given by Dr Roland Bauerschmidt (DPMMS). Note that it will start at 9pm this week – an exception to the usual.
The Universality Phenomenon
Dr Roland Bauerschmidt (DPMMS)
Monday 21st October, Winstanley Lecture Theatre, 9 PM

Many complex systems in mathematics and physics show universal behaviour, i.e., behaviour that is independent of the details of the system. I will illustrate this universality phenomenon in several examples, some well-understood, some still mysterious.

Higher Dimensions – Professor Imre Leader (DPMMS)

Starting off our series of talks this term – our first talk will be given by the wonderful Professor Imre Leader.
Higher Dimensions
Professor Imre Leader (DPMMS)
Monday 14th October, Winstanley Lecture Theatre, 8:30PM
We are all used to thinking about shapes in 2 or 3 dimensions. But what about in 4 dimensions? Or even n dimensions, where n is large?